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Robin is Fossilised.co.uk

My fossils, pottery and other olden finds


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New mystery find! Could these be dinosaur eggs? Click here to see them.

Most of the fossils in my collection came from the beach at Marske, near Redcar. Usually it's jam-packed with fossils on this short stretch of beach - but they are mainly devil's toenails. Sometimes you can also find ammonites, belemnites and other fossils but you have to be lucky and search well. I am promoting this beach at Marske for people to go looking for fossils because I haven't seen this location mentioned in the lists of fossil sites. Here are some fossils from my collection.

Ammonites were marine aminals with no spine. They could be any size from 2 centimetres to about 3 metres. The earliest ammonites were dated as 65 million years old. They were named for the Egyptian god Amon.

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Devil's toenails are the most common fossils is British Jurassic period. They are extinct oysters from the group of marine bivalves, and dated as nearly 200 million years old. They could also travel into rivers and have been found in glaciers. They are called Devil's toenails because people believed they came from a devil. Click here for the video of my collection of Devil's Toenails.

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Belemnites were a type of squid. They appeared around 300 million years ago and became extinct 65 million years ago. Like other squids, belemnites were fast moving carnivores, they had an ink sack and 8 arms with hooks. Belemnites were food for ichtiosaurus who were marine crocodiles. The name belemnite comes from Greek language and means "pointy like a dart".

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Bivalves include clams, oysters, scallops and mussels. Oldest bivalves fossils date back 510 million years. They are called bivalved mollusks because their shell has two parts which are called valves.

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Other fossils

click to enlarge Gastropods can be different shapes and sizes, but mostly have a coiled shell with a pointy top. The oldest gastropod fossils are over 500 million years old.
click to enlarge Corals first appeared over 510 million years ago. They are relatives of
sea anemones and jellyfish. Corals can either live as a colony or as a separate organism. As a colony they build coral reefs in the oceans. Corals are still
alive and well today.
click to enlarge Crinoid, also called a sea lily. The oldest crinoid fossils are 450 million years old. They looke like a plant but they are not. Crinoids are marine animals related to starfish, and they still exist today. Crinoids do not move and are attached to the sea floor by a long stalk. This is a fossilised fragment of a stalk.
click to enlarge These are three different fossils:
an imprint of an ammonite, a tooth and a devil's toenail.
click to enlarge This could be either a fossilised piece of a fish spine,
or it could be a small joint cap.
click to enlarge A part of a dinosaur bone.